Commissions and Collections

Opening in 2013, Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center in Hillsboro, Oregon, has permanently installed “The Beaver Buddies”, a larger-than-life pair of bronze beavers in the main courtyard entrance. This two-figure sculpture was first commissioned by The City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation in 1996, with permanent installations in both Riverside Park and Jacob Schiff Park, Manhattan Island, NYC, NY.

“Bleudog and Pup” were permanently installed in 2012, downtown Woodinville, Washington.  The larger-than-life bassets were a donation commissioned by the late Malka Fricks, a former City Parks and Recreation Commissioner.  The City of Woodinville hosts an annual celebration of the Basset Hound.

Life-size ”Leloup Solitairepurchased by the late newspaper entrepreneur Gene Worrell of Charlottesville, Virginia, was added to The Virginia Museum of Animal Art as part of The Worrell Collection, 2007. Gene Worrell, the former owner and chairman of the board of the Bristol Herald Courier established a newspaper empire, which once included more than 30 newspapers. He and his wife Anne R. Worrell were avid art collectors and active supporters of the arts in Southwest Virginia and Northeast Tennessee.

“Togo”, a life-size running sled dog of Iditarod fame, commissioned by The City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation, was permanently installed in Seward Park, Manhattan Island, NYC, NY, 2000.

“Reynard”, a life-size bronze red fox, purchased by The City of New York, Department of Parks and Recreation, was permanently installed in Fox Park, Manhattan Island, NYC, NY, 2000.

“He Who Thinks He’s Invisible”, a life-size bronze cougar, commissioned by the Oregon Department of Transportation and The City of Joseph, Oregon, was permanently installed on Main Street, Joseph, Oregon, 1999.

Four, 24-inch diameter bas-relief bronze representations of works by Augustus Saint Gaudens, commissioned by The City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation, were permanently installed in the Saint Gaudens Memorial Park, Manhattan Island, NYC, NY, 1997.  They include images of the Standing Liberty, Saint Gaudens’ son Homer, his dog Dunrobin, and two soldiers from the Shaw Memorial.

“Me Hy Yip Yip”, a life-size coyote, in addition to other Curtiss sculptures, was purchased for the private collection of Russell F. and Adrienne Tromley of Tualatin, Oregon. Russell F. Tromely is President, and CEO of Tromley Industrial Holding, Inc., 1997.

Live-size “Reynard” was purchased by Daniel and Pamella G. DeVos of Ada, Michigan, for their private collection, 1996.

“The Beaver Buddies”, two pairs of life-size bronze beavers, commissioned byThe City of New York Department of Parks and Recreation, were permanently installed in Riverside Park and Jacob Schiff Park, Manhattan Island, NYC, NY, 1996.

Life-size Reynard” purchased by Fred Meijer, of Meijer, Inc. Grand Rapids, Michigan, was permanently installed in the Frederik Meijer Gardens and Sculpture Park in Grand Rapids, MI, the largest outdoor sculpture collection in the nation, 1996.

Life-size “LeLoup Solitaire” was purchased in 1995 by Jean M. Auel for her private collection as a tribute to her main character “Wolf”. Jean is the bestselling author of The Land of Painted Caves, The Clan Of The Cave Bear, and the entire Earth's Children Series. She and husband Ray live in Portland, Oregon. Ms. Auel holds four honorary university degrees and has been awarded the French government's Ministry of Culture "Officer in the Order of Arts and Letters” medal.

“Echoes from the Canyon”, Echoes I, Echoes II, Echoes III, a series of three Native American Art Representations from Hell’s Canyon, was commissioned by the U. S. Forest Service, Hell’s Canyon Visitor’s Center, Enterprise, Oregon, 1995.

Bronze reproductions of 1860’s era Bronze Chandeliers were commissioned by the U. S. Treasury Department, U. S. Treasury Building in Washington, DC, for the renovation of the Andrew Johnson Suite, 1993.

“The River Walkers”, a monumental bronze fountain of blue herons, was commissioned by Stan and Leia Simmons, owners of Walker River Resort, Smith, Nevada, 1991.